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Glossary of Business Terms

AIC Online Learning Resources - Glossary

Glossary

Hint: You can perform a keyword search on the glossary using your browser "Find" [Cntrl-F] function.

   

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

A

accelerated depreciation A depreciation method that allows faster write-offs than the straight-line method. Accelerated depreciation methods are often used to write off equipment that may become obsolete before the end of its useful life (e.g., computers).
Source: IWC
     
 
acceptance The agreement by one or all parties to the terms of an offer.
Source: LLL
     
accountant A person skilled in the practice of accounting or who is in charge of public or private accounts. An accountant is responsible for reporting financial results in accordance with government and regulatory authority rules. Both state and national organizations carry responsibility for the certification of accountants.
Source: IWC
 
accrual accounting The accounting method in which income is reported (added into spreadsheets, etc.) when earned and expenses reported when incurred. Accrual accounting methods are required for certain kinds of corporations.
Source: IWC
 
 
action plan, action program A detailed plan showing how major marketing tasks will be managed and implemented, who will do them, and when.
Source: MU
 
 
advertising   The activities associated with attracting public attention to a business, through the use of paid announcements in print or broadcast media, with the ultimate goal of sales or increased sales.
Source: Answers.com
 
 
advertising copy   The content and context of a message contained in an advertisement.
   
   
advertising objectives

Specific aims or intentions of an advertisement (for example, to inform, to persuade, to remind).
Source: MU

   
   
agent An individual or firm authorized to act on behalf of another. Unlike a dealer, the agent does not assume any financial risk in the transaction.
Source: IWC
 
     
arbitration  

A form of dispute resolution where an unbiased person or panel renders an opinion as to responsibility for or extent of a loss. The decision of the judge(s) is considered final and binding. Arbitration is an alternative to a lawsuit or mediation.
Source: EINS

     
assets Ttangible or intangible resources that are owned or controlled by a business, and which have a monetary value.
Source: CMP
   
   
audience quality  

Measure of the kind and quality of the target consumers likely to be exposed to the advertisement.
Source: MU

   

B

     
bailee Someone who accepts sole possession or control over personal property with an agreement to return it to the owner or legal guardian.
Source: CON
     
bailees customers coverage An insurance policy that covers loss or negligence for a bailee, whether or not negligence is involved.
Source: CON
     
bailment The legal relationship created in the act of exchanging control between bailor and bailee.
     
bid The submission of an offer to supply or purchase goods or services, usually in the form of a contract.
     
binding The term used to indicate that something (e.g., a contract) is subject to an obligation.
Source: LLL
     
bookkeeper The person who keeps systematic (daily or short-term) records of income and expense for an individual or firm. There are professional organizations for bookkeepers, but practice, as a rule, does not require certification.
   
   
bond   A promise or guarantee to pay a set sum on the occurrence of a certain event. This definition of the term can be applied to many situations, including the use of a bond as a short-term insurance policy--a guarantee against non-performance. When someone or aninstitution (usually an insurance agency) issues a bond on your behalf, you are said to be bonded.
Source:
ULF
, LLT
 
   
brainstorming

An idea-generating process that emphasizes open communication techniques. Evaluation takes place after all ideas have been expressed.
Source: MU

   
   
brand   A name, sign, symbol, or design, or some combination of these, used to identify a product and to differentiate it from competitors' products.
Source: MU
     
   
breach The violation of an obligation or duty.
Source: LLL
     
   
broker An individual or firm that acts as an intermediary between two parties (e.g., buyer and seller). Brokers usually charge a commission for their services.
Source: IWC
 
business Any continuous and regular activity that has income or profit as its primary purpose.
Source: IRS
   
   
business objectives   Specific, realistic, and measurable goals that an organization plans to achieve within a given period of time.
Source: MU
   
business manager The individual or firm (or, occasionally, computer software program) that oversees certain standard activities of a business. These activities may include bookkeeping, time management, secretarial, and other duties.
   
business failure A business is said to fail when its closure causes a loss to at least one creditor.
   

C

   
call A visit to a client or prospective buyer by a sales representative to gather information, make a sales presentation, secure an order, etc.
Source: MU
   
   
capitalization Capitalization is the market price of an entire company. It is calculated as the sum of debt, stock, and earnings.
Source: IWC
 
cash accounting The accounting system in which revenue and expenses are recognized (added into spreadsheets, etc.) when they are received and paid, respectively.
Source: CMP
 
cash flow statement An accounting presentation that indicates the amount of cash retained by a business after expenses are paid. It is common to calculate cash flow on a monthly basis, but these statements can be calculated for any period.
 
   
client   The party (a person or institution) for which professional services are rendered.
Source: Answers.com
   
   
client base The pool of potenital clients for a business, service or practice. For a specific business, "client base" can also refer to those clients who consistently provide repeat business.
 
   
cold calling   Making a sales call on a client without an appointment.
Source: MU
     
   
common law Laws that derive their force or authority from universal consent or a long-standing practice of the people.
     
   
competitive analysis   The assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of competing firms.
Source: MU
   
   
competitive strategy   The combination of activities undertaken to attract clients, withstand competitive pressures, or strengthen a firm's market position.
Source: CSU
     
 
confidentiality Prevention of disclosure, to other than authorized individuals, of proprietary information or a subject's identity.
     
consideration The inducement, price, or motivation that causes a party to enter into a contract.
Source: LLL
     
   
consultant Someone brought into a firm or job for a limited time to solve one or more specific problems. This can be accomplished under a contract for a specific problem or on a longer-term contract for ongoing needs.
Source: SBNC
 
contract

An agreement made between two or more parties in which an offer is made and accepted and each party benefits. A contract produces a mutually binding legal relationship in which one party or parties must furnish goods or services and another party or parties must pay for them.
Sources:
SBA, LLL

 
contract employee A contract employee works for an agency that contracts out their work to various employers. The agency usually handles the administrative paperwork of employment such as Worker's Compensation insurance and taxes.
Source: SBNC
     
     
contractor A person or entity who, as part of an independent business, becomes obligated to provide goods and/or services for a price.
Source: LLL
     
corporation Aan association (or individual) granted a state charter legally recognizing it as a separate entity with rights, privileges, and liabilities distinct from those of its members. It can sue and be sued by others, enter into contracts, commit crimes, and be punished. A corporation survives even after the death of any or all its stockholders.
Source: SBA
 
cost-benefit analysis A technique to determine the feasibility of a project or plan by quantifying its costs and benefits.
Source: IWC
 

D

     
damages Loss caused by one person to another, or to the property of another, either deliberately or by accident.
     
Data Universal Numbering System
(D-U-N-S)
Aa standard system to identify and record information about businesses used internationally. Owned and administered by Dun and Bradstreet (D&B), a D-U-N-S Number is a nine-digit identification sequence.
Source: SBA
   
 
demand A measure of those in a market who wish to buy a product and can afford to do so.
Source: MU
   
   
depreciation Depreciation is an accounting method that accommodates the changing value of a fixed asset over time. Depreciation systems assume that capital equipment has a limited useful life and that this can be expressed as usage over time. Depreciation may be accelerated or straight-line. Annual depreciation is figured by subtracting the salvage value of the item from its purchase price, and then dividing this number by the asset's estimated years or months of useful life.
     
 
disability insurance A type of insurance that provides payments if illness, disease, or bodily injury prevents the insured from working.
Source: CON
     
disaster A natural or human-caused occurrence causing vast destruction and distress.
Source: SBA
     
     
disclaimer A statement of abandonment--for example a statement of the conditions under which a contract is not valid.
Source: LLL
     
     
due diligence The process of gathering information on condition, legal status, etc., about an asset, object, or person; research.

E

   
economic forecast   A prediction of the likely impact on the business environment of factors such as inflation, interest rates, unemployment, government and consumer spending, etc.
Source: MU
   
   
entrepreneur Someone who starts and controls her or his own business, and who assumes some financial risk in its initiation, operation, and management.
Source: SBA
equity An accounting term that describes the net investment of owners or stockholders in a business. Equity is also the sum of assets and liabilities of a firm.
Source: SBA
     
equity partnership A limited partnership arrangement for providing start-up and seed capital to businesses.
Source: SBA
     
     
excess liability Insurance coverage that is written in excess of the primary insurance.
Source: RUPP
     
     
exchange of value A transaction where something of value (e.g., goods or services) is exchanged for something of equal value (e.g., cash, or other goods or services).
     
expenses The outflows of resources of a firm that result from efforts made by the firm to earn revenues.
Source: CMP
 
 

F

 
 
fair market value Fair market value is the price for goods, services, or property agreed upon by a willing buyer and a willing seller, both of whom have the same information about the article for sale.
Source: SBA
     
 
firm offer rule The acknowledgment, enforced by the UCC, that a contract is revokable until it is signed.
     
fixed cost A cost that does not vary depending on production or sales levels, such as rent, property tax, insurance, or interest expense. See also overhead.
     
     
floater An attachment to a homeowner's policy that insures such movable property as jewelry or musical instruments.
Source: III
     
     
force majeure Literally, "greater force." Unforseen events beyond the control of all parties in a contract. These may include acts of God, war, or failure of third parties to perform their obligations.
Source: YALE
     
freelancer Someone who pursues a profession under no long-term contractual commitments to any one employer or company. They are on their own to find work, negotiate the terms and compensation for that work, and deliver the work to the satisfaction of the paying client.
Source: SBNC
 

G

 
     
goods Any type of commodity or item involved in trade, excluding services.
Source: LLL
     
 
goodwill An intangible asset of a business. It relates to a favorable relationship with customers and excess earning power.
Source: SBA
 
gross profit

The amount left when selling costs and operating expenses are deducted from total revenue; also called gross margin.
Source: MU

 
gross revenue The sum of total revenue minus any deductions generated by a firm.
   
   
growth strategies The means by which an organization plans to achieve its objective to grow in volume and turnover. Four broad growth strategies are available--market penetration, product development, market development, and diversification.
Source: MU
     
     
guarantee To give a surety or assume responsibility.
 

H

 
     
health plan Any one of several types of insurance that cover physician visits, hospital services, medical tests, and other costs incurred in medical care.
Source: CON
     
 
home business A company for which the primary office is in the owner's home.
Source: SBNC
 
 

I

 
 
inception payment A payment made by a contractor (client) to a contractee (conservator), usually at the contract signing. An inception payment may be a percentage of the total estimate or fee, or it may be a set amount.
     
     
indemnify To provide financial compensation for losses.
Source: III
     
   
informational label   A label that carries information, including use instructions, precautions, and warnings.
Source: MU
   
   
informative advertising Advertising intended to inform rather than to persuade or remind.
Source: MU
   
   
income statement The accounting report that shows all the revenues and expenses of the firm for a stated period of time. The result indicates the net income or net loss within that period.
Source: SBA
 
independent contractor An an individual who works for herself or himself and who controls or directs both the means and the result of his or her work.
Source: SBNC
 
independent professional Someone with an advanced academic degree or specialized training or experience who works as an independent contractor.
Source: SBNC
     
     
insurance agent A representative of one or, if independent, several insurance companies.
Source: III
     
insurance broker A person who sources insurance contracts on behalf of their customers.
     
insurance company A firm that provides insurance.
     
insurance lines The different types of insurance offered by an insurance company, its agent, or a broker.
     
inventory Merchandise that is purchased and/or produced and stored for eventual sale.
Source: SBA
 

J

 

K

 

L

 
     
legal competence A requirement for participation in signing a contract usually based on consideration, awareness, and the ability to express oneself.
     
Letter of Agreement (LOA) A contract, or preliminary contract, sent out as a letter, with a place for a countersignature by the recipient.
     
 
liability

1. Any legal responsibility, duty or obligation. 2. The amount or amounts that the firm owes to others due to past transactions or events. Liabilities have a first claim on any assets.

     
     
liability coverage Insurance designed to compensate for bodily injury or property damage caused to another person.
     
     
life insurance A policy whereby the insurance company pays a stated amount of money upon the death of the insured to the person(s) identified as beneficiaries.
Source: CON
     
     
limit The maximum amount that can be claimed against an insurance policy.
Source: III
     
Limited Liability Company (LLC) A type of company in which owners and managers receive the limited liability of a corporation and the tax benefits and operational flexibilities of a partnership.
 
Limited Liability Partnership (LLP) Another name for a limited liability company, often used by professional associations. The partner or investor's liability is limited to the amount he/she has invested in the company.
 
Limited Partnership (LP) A business arrangement whereby the operation is administered by one or more general partners and funded by limited or silent partners who are legally responsible for losses based only on the amount of their investment. A business formation that includes at least one general partner and one or more limited partners. Limited partners also enjoy rights to the partnership's cash flow, but are not liable for company obligations.
   
   
logo   A distinctive mark, sign, or symbol, or a graphic version of a company's name, used to identify and promote its product.
Source: MU
   
long-term A period of one year or more.
Source: SBA
 

M

 
   
major equipment   Long-lived business assets that must be depreciated over time; capital items.
Source: MU
   
   
market

All the buyers and potential buyers of a product who profess some level of interest in it and who can afford it.
Source: MU

   
   
market forecast   The anticipated sales for a market as a whole during a given period, taking into account prevailing environmental circumstances.
   
   
market growth rate   The rate, commonly expressed as a percentage per annum, at which a market is increasing in size.
Source: MU
   
   
market position   The strategic area occupied by a business or practice among all other businesses or practices offering the same services.
 
market value The price a willing buyer will pay for goods, services, a property, or a business.
Source: SBA
 
marketing

The systematic planning, implementation and control of a mix of business activities intended to bring together buyers and sellers for the mutually advantageous exchange or transfer of products.
Source: MU

 
   
marketing effectiveness   The degree to which the objectives of a marketing strategy have been achieved; the effectiveness is commonly gauged by measuring the effect on sales, brand awareness, brand preference, etc.
Source: MU
   
   
marketing objectives   Specific, measurable aims or expected outcomes of marketing activity to be achieved in a given period.
Source: MU
   
   
marketing plan   A detailed, written account and timetable of a firm's objectives and ethods to be used to achieve its marketing goals.
Source: MU
 
   
marketing program   The combination of all the marketing plans of an organization.
Source: MU
 
   
marketing research   A formal, planned approach to the collection, analysis, interpretation and reporting of information required for marketing decision-making.
Source: MU
 
   
marketing strategy   An integrated plan for the use of marketing techniques to attract or retain business. A marketing strategy includes goals, activities and projected outcomes.
   
materials (or supplies) The portion of a business inventory that are consumed as the work of the business is performed.
 
Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) A description, issued by a manufacturer or supplier, of the occupational hazards of chemicals or materials. It contains information such as physical data, toxicity, health effects, first aid, reactivity, storage, disposal, protective equipment, and spill/leak procedures.
Source: ILPI
     
     
mediation   A dispute-resolution process in which a neutral person works with all parties to a contract to resolve contract differences. Mediation is an alternative to a lawsuit or arbitration.
Source: BOI
     
     
Memorandum of Understanding (MOA) An agreement that defines a plan and the roles of parties within it.
     
merchant One whose business it is to buy and sell merchandise.
Source: LLL
     
   
mission statement An answer to the question "What business are we in?" or "What do we do?" The mission statement, with a broad focus and a customer orientation, gives a sense of purpose.
Source: MU
   
 

N

 
   
need-directed consumers   One of three broad groups of consumers (with outer-directed consumers and inner-directed consumers) identified in the Stanford Research Institute's survey of American lifestyles. Need-directed consumers, representing about 10 per cent of consumers in the United States, are motivated by need rather than by choice.
Source: MU
   
   
net income The amount of income or loss that results when all expenses are subtracted from revenues. If the result is positive, net income is profit.
 
net worth The number that results when total liabilities are subtracted from total assets. A business may have a negative net worth if it has more liabilities than assets.
Source: SBA
   
   
networking   Establishing an informal set of contacts among people with common social and business interests as a source of prospects, for the exchange of information, and for support.
Source: MU
   
not-for-profit (non-profit, nfp) A business corporation with stated charitable, humanitarian, or educational purposes that is exempt from some taxes and in which no one benefits from financial profits or losses.
 

O

 
 
Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA)   The government agency charged with ensuring safe and healthful working conditions for all workers. OSHA authorizes enforcement of standards developed under the Occupational Safety and Health Act and supports research, information, education, and training in occupational safety and health.
Source: SBA
     
 
offer A proposition or proposal to enter into certain arrangements.
Source: LLL
     
 
office manager The person who oversees resources and expenditures and insures that business functions of a private practice run smoothly. Duties will depend on the practice; they may include overseeing workflow, client contact, ordering, bookkeeping, or secretarial work.
     
 
oral agreement A contract for which there is no written documentation.
     
overhead Expenses such as rent, utilities, and insurance that must be paid whether or not the firm has produced revenues. See also fixed cost.
 
 

P

 
   
Pareto's Principle   The idea or notion in business, commonly known as "the 80:20 rule" that says that 80 percent of the revenue comes from 20 percent of the products, that 80 percent of the sales volume is derived from 20 percent of the customer accounts, etc. named after Vilfredo Pareto, the nineteenth-century economist and sociologist.
Source: MU
   
   
partnership A legal relationship between two or more persons contractually associated as joint principals in a business.
Source: SBA
     
   
party (or parties) The person(s) entering into a contract or making a claim.
Source: LLL
     
   
per capita income   Average income per person in a population.
Source: MU
     
   
performance The fulfillment or accomplishment of a promise, contract, or obligation.
Source: LLL
     
   
persuasive advertising Advertising intended to persuade (rather than to inform or remind).
Source: MU
   
   
petty cash A small fund maintained by a business to cover incidental expenses.
Source: SBA
 
   
positioning   The outcome of efforts to control public perception of a product or service. Marketing efforts, for example are always directed to improve the positioning, or increase the visibility and perception of quality, of the good or service being marketed.
Source: BB
 
   
potential market All the individuals and organizations in a particular market that have some level of interest in the product.
Source: MU
   
   
precautionary balances Cash held for emergencies or unexpected outflows of funds. Also known as "contingency fund."
Source: SBA
   
   
prestige pricing   A pricing strategy in which prices are set at a high level, recognizing that lower prices will inhibit sales rather than encourage them and that buyers will associate a high price for the product with superior quality.
Source: MU
   
   
primary research The gathering and evaluation of data relating to questions as they apply to a specific business, service, or profession.
   
   
profit The revenue that remains at the end of a given period when total liabilities are subtracted from total assets.
 
profit-loss statement

An accounting statement showing income, expenditure, and profit over a given period.
Source: MU

 
projected income statement A quantitative estimate of future economic or financial performance.
   
   
promotion One of the four controllable variables (with product, price, and place) of the marketing mix.
Source: MU
     
   
property coverage Insurance for damage to or loss of policyholders' property and legal liability for damages caused to other people or their property.
Source: III
     
   
public relations   Promotional activities designed to increase public awareness and improve public perceptions of an individual, a business, or a service.
   
   
publicity   Information about an individual, business, event or activity intended to attract public notice through the use of broadcast and narrowcast media.
   
 

Q

 
   
qualitative marketing research   Marketing research that is not generally quantifiable; research that seeks insights into a marketing situation but does not require statistical accuracy. Qualitative research techniques include focus groups, depth interviews, and projection techniques such as free associations, psychodrawing, and psychodrama. See Quantitative Marketing Research.
Source: MU
   
   
quantitative marketing research   Marketing research that can be quantified; the collection of data that can be expressed in numerical terms.
Source: MU
   
 

R

 
 
Request for Proposal (RFP) A solicitation issued by the government or another agency to prospective offerers. An RFP usually describes what the task or tasks will require and how the offerers will be evaluated.
Source: SBA
     
   
reinsurance Insurance bought by insurers to limit their own risk.
Source: III
     
   
Return on Investment (ROI)   A measure of a firm's profitability in which profits are expressed as a percentage of investment.
Source: MU
   
revenue The amount of inflows from the sale of goods or rendering of services during an accounting period.
     
 
rider An attachment to an insurance policy that alters the policy's coverage or terms.
Source: III
     
risk mitigation (risk management) All the efforts to reduce business liability of any kind (financial, legal, occupational, etc.) to an acceptable level.
Source: OPF
 

S

 
 
S Corporation A special form of incorporation that can draw on many of the benefits of a corporation but pays taxes as a partnership. See also Limited Liability Company.
     
   
schedule A list of individual items or groups of items that are covered under one policy or a listing of specific benefits, charges, credits, assets, or other defined items.
Source: III
     
   
secondary research   Research based on reviews of literature, articles, websites, and the research published by other people (or entities). In general, secondary research is used to answer general questions about the business environment in a region or community.
   
self-employed A person is self-employed if she or he owns or runs a trade or business rather than working as an employee for someone else.
 
self-employment tax A federal tax on individual income that is similar to Social Security and Medicare taxes. Currently 15.3 percent of self-employment profit, the self-employment tax is calculated on Schedule SE and on IRS Form 1040.
Source: IRS
     
 
services The non-material equivalent of a good, this is the performance of duties or provision of space.
     
short-term A period of one year or less.
Source: SBA
 
sole proprietorship The simplest form of business ownership, in which the company and the company owner are one and the same.
Source: SBA
     
 
special crime/ disaster insurance A type of insurance that covers specific, and special, types of liabilities such as flood, hurricanes, etc.
     
     
spreadsheet A visual display, often in a computer program, that presents data in a grid of rows and columns. This grid is referred to as a worksheet. When a computer spreadsheet is used, calculations may be automated.
 
start-up costs The total amount of money needed to open a business and maintain it through a certain initial period, or up to a pre-set point of profitability.
 
straight-line depreciation The depreciation method that assumes a fixed asset will lose an equal amount of value every year over its lifetime.
Source: IWC
 
subcontract A contract between a prime contractor and an individual or company (the subcontractor) to furnish supplies or services for the completion of a prime contract or subcontract.
Source: SBA
 
subcontractor The individual or company engaged to perform specialized work in the completion of a prime contract or subcontract.
   
   
SWOT An acronym for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats. A SWOT analysis is a technique to identify the strengths and weaknesses of a business, the opportunities for it, and the threats to success. Analysis considers the balancing or offsetting effect of each on the other.
   
 

T

 
     
termination Cancellation or ending of a contract.
     
   
testimonials   Written recommendations from satisfied purchasers of a product to be used in selling it to new prospects.
Source: MU
   
   
trademark   A name, design or symbol registered for the exclusive use by a manufacturer to distinguish its product.
Source: MU
   
 

U

 
Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) A model statute, adopted by all U.S. states except Louisiana, that covers such transactions as the sale of goods, credit, and bank transactions.
     

V

 
 
variable costs The costs of doing business that are directly related to the sales of goods or services. Examples include the cost of goods, shipping, handling and storage, and sales commissions. In contrast to fixed costs, the actual monetary amount of variable costs may not be the same from accounting period to accounting period.
Source: SBA
   
   
vendor A seller or supplier.
Source: MU
   
 

W

 
     
waiver The relinquishing or refusal to accept a right.
Source: LLL
     
waiver of subrogation

The relinquishing of the right to seek recovery for damages from another, legally liable, party.
Sources:
III,LLL

     
   
wants   The form, shaped by culture and individual personality, in which basic human needs are given expression. For example, the need to satisfy hunger might be expressed as a want of meat by one person, and as a want of fruit by another.
Source: MU
   
   
warranty  

A promise about a product made by either a manufacturer or a seller.
Source: LLL

   
   
word of mouth   An unpaid form of promotion in which satisfied customers tell other people how much they like product or a service.
Source: GMEG
     
   
Worker's Compensation A type of insurance, purchased by employers, that covers job-related injury to employees.
Source: CON
     
   
working capital The cash and short-term assets that can be used for current needs such as bills and salaries.
Source: SBA
 

X

 

Y

 

Z

 
 
 

Sources:

Answers.com (www.answers.com)

BB: Building Brands Marketing Definitions (www.buildingbrands.com/definitions/05_positioning_definition.shtml)

BE: "General Resources" Business Essentials, Canadian 3rd Edition Pearson/Prentice Hall (wps.prenhall.com/ca_ph_ebert_busess_3/0,6518,224378-,00.html)

BOI: Jim Johnston, Your Boise Idaho Realtor, Real Estate Glossary (www.boise-idahos-real-estate.com/mortgage-glossary-143.html)

CMcN: Carter McNamara, "Basic Definitions: Advertising, Marketing, Promotion, Public Relations and Publicity, and Sales" (www.mapnp.org/library/ad_prmot/defntion.htm)

CMP: Christine M. Piotrowski, Professional Practices for Interior Designers (New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1994)

CON: Laura Condon's handout, Risk Management Workshop, June 17, 2006 (www.ace.uiuc.edu/cfe/insurance/terms.html)

CSU: California State University, Chico, "Strategic Management Self Study Modules" (www.csuchico.edu/mgmt/strategy)

EINS: e-insure.com, Insurance Terms Glossary (http://www.einsure.com/glossary.aspx)

GMEG: Glencoe Marketing Essentials Glossary (www.glencoe.com/sec/busadmin/marketing/dp/food_mktg/gloss.shtml)

III: Insurance Information Institute Glossary of Insurance Terms (www.iii.org/individuals/glossary.htm)

ILPI: Interactive Learning Paradigms, Incorporated (www.ilpi.com)

IRS: IRS Understanding Tax Glossary (www.irs.gov/app/understandingTaxes/jsp/s_tools_glossary.jsp)

IWC: Investor Words, part of WebFinance Inc., (www.investorwords.com)

LLL: Lectric Law Library's Legal Lexicon (/www.lectlaw.com/def.htm)

LLT: Labor Law Talk "Dictionary" (http://dictionary.laborlawtalk.com)

MU: Marketing Dictionary: Virtual Library at Monash University (www.buseco.monash.edu.au/depts/mkt/dictionary/)

OPF: Firesmith Open Process Framework (www.donald-firesmith.com/index.html?Components/WorkUnits)

RUPP: Rupp's Insurance & Risk Management Glossary (insurance.cch.com/rupps/index.htm)

SBA: Small Business Administration, SBA Glossary (app1.sba.gov/glossary/)

SBNC: SBNC Glossary section of Small Business Notes (www.smallbusinessnotes.com/glossary/defhomebasedbus.html)

ULF: US Legal Forms (www.uslegalforms.com/lawdigest/legal-definitions/legal-definitions-alpha.htm)

YALE: Library, Yale University (www.library.yale.edu)

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